How to Build a Cheap 6×6 Off-Roader

I’ve often wondered how difficult it would be to build a 6×6 drivetrain, and as this YouTube video demonstrates, it’s not that difficult!

You can power all six of your vehicle’s wheels for optimal traction with just two conventional transfer cases, a handful of driveshafts, and a little manufacturing talent.

This is another video series by Garage 54 ENG, the weird Russian fabricators, and backyard scientists. The first of the two YouTube films don’t show the drivetrain, but it does show the team employing two inverted leaf springs, steel rods, and an axle shaft mounted to two pillow block bearings to build a suspension that connects the two rear axle housings.

You’ll notice that the pinion on the rearmost axle is pointed upward. The reason for that is to allow for a driveshaft to reach back to that differential without interfering with the middle axle.

Here’s a look: But the interesting part of the video series comes when Garage 54 ENG shows us the drivetrain:

The way they’ve set up their 6×6 drivetrain appears to be really straightforward. A transfer case usually has a single input from the transmission on the front.

The transfer case, therefore, has two outputs: one on the front, close to the transmission input, which goes to the front differential/axle, and one on the back, which goes to the rear differential/axle.

Garage 54 ENG appears to have installed one transfer case conventionally, with power from the gearbox going into the transfer case input, front output power going to the front axle, and rear output power going to the rear axle—a fairly standard system. Instead of travelling to the rear axle, the rear output driveshaft goes into the back side of another transfer case.

The second transfer case’s back side, which normally just has a single output for the rear driveshaft, is now the input, while the other side has two outputs that match the transmission input and the front driveshaft output. The driveshafts that send power to the rear axles are connected to the two outputs.

Here’s how it looks under the Niva:

And here’s a little drawing I made showing what I’ve interpreted to be Garage 54 ENG’s basic drivetrain setup:

It actually seems quite simple and cheap (considering a number of the parts are either used or home-made), and I kind of want to try it myself sometime. Because 4×4 is great, but clearly 6×6 is greater.

BUILDING A 6×6

The adapted 4×4 truck is incredible in difficult off-road situations. However, compared to the 444, driving a 666 in bad weather is a blast! When driving a 666 Arctic Truck, you have better flotation and traction, making driving on soft terrains like snow and sand much easier.

You can also drive more easily through uneven terrain with the second axle, resulting in less pitching and more comfort for the passengers. A 666 vehicle can also handle significantly more weight than a 444 vehicle.

The adapted 4×4 truck is incredible in difficult off-road situations. However, compared to the 444, driving a 666 in bad weather is a blast! When driving a 666 Arctic Truck, you have better flotation and traction, making driving on soft terrains like snow and sand much easier.

You can also drive more easily through uneven terrain with the second axle, resulting in less pitching and more comfort for the passengers. A 666 vehicle can also handle significantly more weight than a 444 vehicle.

In Antarctica, where conditions can be extremely harsh, the 66 Arctic Trucks have performed exceptionally well! It’s nearly unstoppable, and it’s a colossal machine.

Almost every component of the original vehicle is eliminated when constructing a 666 Arctic Truck. The body is taken out first, followed by the engine and transmission, and finally the entire suspension system.

The primary part of the original chassis rails is removed, and the surviving front component is welded to a significantly stronger rear piece.

A specifically designed second axle housing is required to provide engine power to all six wheels. The additional axle housing houses a lockable transfer case that provides a 60/40 torque split between the front and rear wheels.

To ensure that the vehicle is ready for harsh situations, locking differentials are installed on all three axles. The car can then deliver full power to all six wheels at the same time.

On both rear axles, the Hilux 666 gets a new 4-link type suspension system, heavy-duty coil springs, and high-performance shock absorbers.

But, of course, the front must also be altered! Almost every aspect of the suspension and steering system, as well as the original front section of the chassis, has been strengthened.

New heavy-duty coil springs and high-performance shock absorbers are installed in the front, just as they are in the back, to ensure that they can manage the harsh conditions.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.