Ways to Motivate Yourself to Achieve Your Goals

“Self-pity is our deadliest adversary, and if we succumb to it, we will never be able to accomplish anything worthwhile in this life.” Helen Keller is a famous author.

Everyone appears to want to know what we’re doing (or hope to do) with our life, from the time our kindergarten teachers asked us what we wanted to be when we grew up to the job interview question that asks us to imagine where we see ourselves in five or ten years.

Some of us have mental road maps with mile markers for each goal: get a college diploma, snag a dream job, establish a family, visit Mars, conquer the world—whatever it is. Others like to take the scenic path.

We have a vague image of someone in the distant future who looks like us and is accomplishing incredible feats, but they are too far away for us to see what those feats are.

Whether you’ve had your entire life planned out since you were five years old or are just winging it, we all need a kick start now and again to keep us moving in the correct direction—or any direction for that matter. Here are eight unique techniques to keep yourself motivated to achieve your objectives.

1. Sing to yourself

Seriously. Singing, like laughing, sunshine, and fresh air improves our moods and well-being. It can even be used as a group activity to improve workplace teamwork.

More information can be found here. Singing has been demonstrated to cause the production of endorphins, which are the body’s natural chemical pain and stress relievers.

We get more done when we’re happier. This could explain why Snow White whistles while working.

2. Visualize your success

According to Dr. Frank Niles, visualization is a simple but effective motivational approach because it allows you to visualize the possibility of achieving your goal by forming a mental image of success. When I was in graduate school and working on my dissertation, there were days when completing my daily writing goal felt impossible, let alone finishing the complete book-length project that sat in my stomach like a baby with an undetermined due date.

When I felt overwhelmed, I’d imagine myself walking across the stage, receiving my diploma, and finally earning the three letters at the end of my name for which I’d spent so much blood, sweat, and tears.

3. Speak about achieving your goals in definitive, positive terms

Say “when I get married,” “when I receive that rise,” and “when I quit smoking” instead of “if I get married,” “if I get that increase,” and “if I quit smoking.” As a result, your focus moves from possibility to reality.

Dr. Wayne Dyer, a spiritual teacher, and best-selling author has written and lectured widely about the “I Am” discourse, a type of positive thinking that borrows its name from Judeo-Christian Scripture but may be applied to any situation.

God didn’t introduce himself to Moses as “I will be,” or “My name is I hope things will work out,” according to Dyer. No.

“I am,” he simply stated. According to Dr. Dyer, using this affirmative vocabulary in our own life can help us picture our goals and keep our eyes on the prize.

4. Use sticker charts

Say “when I get married,” “when I receive that rise,” and “when I quit smoking” instead of “if I get married,” “if I get that increase,” and “if I quit smoking.”

As a result, your focus moves from possibility to reality. Dr. Wayne Dyer, a spiritual teacher, and best-selling author, has written and lectured widely about the “I Am” discourse, a type of positive thinking that borrows its name from Judeo-Christian Scripture but may be applied to any situation.

God didn’t introduce himself to Moses as “I will be,” or “My name is I hope things will work out,” according to Dyer. No.

5. Keep a goal diary

Writing down your goals and commenting on their progress on a regular basis, similar to producing a chart with eye-catching pictures, helps you focus on the desired outcome while also holding you accountable.

In 1979, students in the Harvard MBA school were questioned if they had goals and if they had written them down in a study. 3 percent had goals written down, 13% had goals but hadn’t written them down, and 84 percent had no clearly defined goals.

The survey found that the 3% of people who had written down their goals were the most financially successful ten years later.

While financial stability is simply one measure of success that can be quantified, the study does find a correlation between clearly articulating one’s goals and success.

6. Find a “study buddy”

While this is a good approach to get pupils to finish their homework, it can also help anyone who has trouble settling down to work. I used to observe that while my boyfriend was doing the same thing in the other room, I graded papers faster.

While this may or may not work for everyone, I’ve always found that glancing up from time to time to make a comment on anything I’ve read does more than provide a pause in the action.

The other individual serves as a sounding board for my thoughts. Watson’s observations were even used by Sherlock Holmes to solve his cases.

7. Keep a corkboard in your workspace or someplace visible, with empowering quotations

Yoda is a fantastic source of motivation for me. It’s difficult to give up something when you’re faced with a “do or do not” situation. “There is no try” is right in front of your eyes. Consider your favorite novels and films, as well as your role models.

Choose your favorite motivational quotations and keep them near you to remind you that you can do everything you set your mind to.

8. Daydream

I’m heading somewhere with this, which may seem counterintuitive. You undoubtedly recall being chastised in Biology class for looking into your lab partner’s unfathomable blue eyes instead of concentrating on the frog you were supposed to dissect.

There is, however, a method to procrastinate “consciously, artistically, and, most crucially, guiltlessly,” according to Margrit Tarpalaru.

Tarpalaru, a teacher who employs this strategy to speed up grading, calls it a “micro-break,”[1] which many of us probably associate with that reflexive inclination to check Facebook for five minutes, only to glance up twenty minutes later and wonder how we were dragged into the social media vortex.

Instead, Tarpalaru recommends methods such as a momentary daydream.

Raise your eyes from your computer screen for a few moments and consider all of the wonderful things that await you once you’ve completed the day or week: biking with your spouse, drinking with friends, and planning your summer cruise.

This approach, like the other visualization strategies we’ve discussed, keeps your eye on the prize, and it’s a deliberate sort of procrastination since you can’t have that drink or board that cruise ship unless you achieve that deadline, which pushes your attention to return to the present.

Reference:

  1. Hook and Eye: Staying Afloat: In Praise of Micro-Breaks

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